Protecting pollinators

Hughstin Grimshaw-Surette carrying plants for the SMU Pollinator Garden in the Oaks Living Laboratory. Terrell Roulston (in background) is a SMU Biology major going into his 2nd year. 

Hughstin Grimshaw-Surette carrying plants for the SMU Pollinator Garden in the Oaks Living Laboratory. Terrell Roulston (in background) is a SMU Biology major going into his 2nd year. 


Bees, butterflies and students all stand to benefit from a recent addition to the Saint Mary's.

The SMU Pollinator Garden supports bee and butterfly nectar and pollen collection and provides nesting resources for ground and cavity-nesting wild bees. It will also serve as a hands-on resource for teaching courses in Biology, Environmental Science and Studies. 

Hughstin Grimshaw-Surette is an outstanding MSc in Applied Science student but also a gifted visual artist and costume designer. He developed the plan for the SMU Pollinator Garden in the Oaks Living Laboratory, selecting over 30 plant species native to Nova Scotia that will provide resources for wild bees and other important pollinators. Hughstin’s graduate research has focused on the bees that use green roofs in urban Halifax and Dartmouth and is funded by NSERC and Nova Scotia Graduate Scholarships.

The project is being run by the Ecology of Plants in Community lab in the SMU Biology Department and funded by the SMU Academic Sustainability Fund under the direction of the School of the Environment.