Dr. Ather Akbari featured in Globe and Mail

Dr. Akbari’s research “highlights the need to attract immigrants to the region and ensure retention of newcomers through community involvement, settlement programs and government intervention at the municipal, provincial and federal levels.”

Dr. Akbari’s research “highlights the need to attract immigrants to the region and ensure retention of newcomers through community involvement, settlement programs and government intervention at the municipal, provincial and federal levels.”

Dr. Ather Akbari, chair of the Atlantic Research Group on Economics of Immigration, Aging and Diversity, and academic coordinator of the Master in Applied Economics program at the Sobey School of Business, was recently featured in the Globe and Mail. Here’s an excerpt:

“When Syrian refugee Tareq Hadhad arrived in Antigonish, N.S., in December 2015, he received a warm welcome from the local community. His family joined him a month later and, in August 2016, he opened a business with the help of local volunteers.

Hadhad’s enterprise, Peace By Chocolate, has often been cited, including by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a speech at the United Nations, as an example of the positive impact of immigration.

For Dr. Ather Akbari, this success story not only illustrates what immigrants can contribute to society, it also shows a growing awareness in communities that welcoming and supporting newcomers can lead to better outcomes for all, especially in a region that struggles with a declining population growth.

Dr. Akbari, who is the chair of the Atlantic Research Group on Economics of Immigration, Aging and Diversity, and academic coordinator of the Master in Applied Economics program at the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary’s University, explains that Atlantic provinces are seeing lower birth rates and an outward migration of young people, which have economic as well as political effects.”

Read more here!